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Workplace Health Management

A safe and pleasant working environment serves as a source of physical, mental, and organizational well-being, contributing to the overall health and soundness of individuals. Conversely, an unfavorable work environment has the potential to cause injuries and illnesses.
To enhance the health and efficiency of workers and foster a workplace with a positive health image, it is essential to incorporate the concept of "health promotion." This involves transforming negative notions of disease prevention into proactive actions that maintain both physical and mental well-being. By doing so, we aim to safeguard valuable human resources and create more favorable conditions in the workplace.

Physical (Health) Examination

1. Article 20 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act stipulates employers shall conduct a physical exam for recruits and health checkups for current employees.
2. Please visit https://hrpts.osha.gov.tw/asshp/hrpm1055.aspx for a list of medical institutions designated by central authorities for pre-employment physical exams.
3. Employers shall conduct regular general health checkups for current employees pursuant to the following provisions:
Once a year for employees 65 years old and above.
Once every 3 years for employees between 40 to 65 years old.
Once every 3 years for employees under 40 years old.
4. Physical Examination/Health Checkup Items:

General Physical Exam
For New Recruits

General Health Checkup
For Current Employees

  1. Review of work experience, medical history, lifestyle habits, and subjective symptoms.
  2. Physical exam of height, weight, waistline, eyesight, color vision, hearing, blood pressure, and other body systems or parts.
  3. Chest (large film) X-ray
  4. Proteinuria and hematuria tests
  5. Hemoglobin and white blood cell count
  6. Blood glucose, alanine transaminase (ALT), creatinine, cholesterol, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol tests
  7. Other tests designated by central authorities.
  1. Review of work experience, medical history, lifestyle habits, and subjective symptoms.
  2. Physical exam of height, weight, waistline, eyesight, color vision, hearing, blood pressure, and other body systems or parts.
  3. Chest (large film) X-ray
  4. Proteinuria and Hematuria tests
  5. Hemoglobin and white blood cell count
  6. Blood glucose, alanine transaminase (ALT), creatinine, cholesterol, triglyceride, high- and
    low-density lipoprotein cholesterol
    tests.
  7. Other tests designated by central authorities.
Source from the General Physical Examination and Health Examination Items Table in the Occupational Health Protection Regulations Appendix 8.

Corporate Employee Health Service Contract

On-Site Service

In accordance with Article 22 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, business entities with a workforce of fifty or more employees are required to employ or contract healthcare personnel to handle health management, occupational disease prevention, and health promotion for their workers.
  • If you wish to make an appointment for on-site services or have related questions, please refer to the information on on-site services for the current year.

Workplace Maternal Health Protection

In compliance with the regulations outlined in Article 31 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act concerning the protection of maternal workers' health, the university has carefully planned and implemented necessary safety and health measures for maternal health protection. A maternal health protection plan has been established to ensure the physical and mental well-being of female faculty and staff during pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding.

(1) Target Groups:

  • Expectant mothers.
  • Pregnant women.
  • Postpartum, including normal delivery, stillbirth after 24 weeks of pregnancy, and within one year after childbirth.
  • Breastfeeding mothers.

(2) Management Contents:

  1. Work Environment: Provide appropriate protective equipment, control exposure levels and time, and adjust the work environment (including space, lighting, computer desks, chairs, etc.).
  2. Working Hours Adjustment: Increase rest time and frequency, adjust shifts, and shift hours.
  3. Other Preventive Measures: Inform workers of the hazards and prevention measures, and prohibit certain tasks.
  4. Job Adjustment or Leave of Absence.

(3) Reporting Method:

Please report to the occupational health nurse at the center.
  • Includes "Self-Assessment Form for the Health Status of Female Employees During Pregnancy and Within One Year After Childbirth."
  • Includes "Risk Assessment Form for the Workplace Environment and Occupational Hazards of Maternal Health Protection."

Related Advocacy

Prevention of Abnormal Workload

In accordance with Article 6, Paragraph 2, Subparagraph 2, and Article 10 of the Regulations for the Implementation of the Occupational Safety and Health Act by the Ministry of Labor, measures for health management are provided to prevent employees of the university from developing diseases due to abnormal workloads. This includes shift work, night shifts, and prolonged working hours. The aim is to prevent employees from developing brain and cardiovascular diseases due to excessive labor accumulation, achieve early detection, and ensure early treatment, thereby safeguarding the physical and mental health of the relevant workers.

Targets:

  1. Shift work.
  2. Night shifts.
  3. Prolonged working hours.
  4. Healthcare personnel evaluated based on physical (health) examination reports, with a risk of developing brain or cardiovascular diseases exceeding 10% within the next ten years.
  5. Other abnormal workloads: Including irregular work, frequent business trips, and work environments with abnormal temperatures, noise, or jet lag. Additionally, daily workloads and events associated with mental stress fall into this category.

Prevention of Human Factor Hazards

In compliance with Article 6, Paragraph 2, Subparagraph 1 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, which includes provisions related to the prevention of occupational hazards, the university takes necessary safety and health measures to prevent musculoskeletal disorders caused by repetitive tasks. A "Human Factor Hazard Prevention Plan" has been established to safeguard the health and well-being of the university's faculty and staff, preventing human factor hazards and avoiding repetitive musculoskeletal injuries.

Implementation Method:

Conduct proactive self-awareness symptom surveys for faculty and staff using the "Musculoskeletal Symptom Survey Form." This survey is administered as a paper questionnaire during routine occupational health examinations.

Eliminate Workplace Bullying

In accordance with the provisions of "Article 6, Paragraph 2, Subparagraph 3" of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, employers must plan and implement necessary safety measures to ensure the physical and mental health of workers who may suffer bodily or mental harm due to the actions of others in the course of their duties. This plan is specifically formulated to prevent workplace violence and achieve the prevention and handling of workplace violence incidents.

This written statement was approved by resolution during the 3rd Occupational Safety and Health Committee meeting of the 2018 academic year held on November 5, 2018.

Workplace Smoking Prevention Advocacy

In accordance with the provisions of the "Tobacco Hazards Prevention Act," the university is designated as a completely smoke-free area.

(1) Hazards of Smoking

Cigarette smoke contains over 7000 chemical substances, including several hundred toxic components and approximately 93 carcinogens and harmful substances. The longer one smokes, the greater the threat to health. Quitting smoking early allows the body to gradually recover from the damages caused by smoking.

(2) Smoking Cessation Services

Quitting smoking can reduce the risk of most health problems caused by smoking, including cancer, heart disease, and lung diseases. People of all ages can improve their health by quitting smoking, with greater health improvements seen in those who quit at a younger age. Compared to individuals who continue to smoke, those who quit smoking have a 30% to 50% lower risk of developing lung cancer 10 years later. Additionally, their risk of developing oral or esophageal cancer within 5 years of quitting smoking is also reduced by half. Quitting smoking, along with discontinuing other unhealthy behaviors, can improve long-term health and quality of life.

Free Smoking Cessation Helpline

  • Service Hours: Monday to Saturday, 09:00 - 21:00 (Except during the Lunar New Year period and Sundays, normal service on public holidays)
  • Service Method: You can call the toll-free helpline at 0800-636363 from your mobile phone, landline, or public phone. You can also inquire via LINE (ID: @tsh0800636363).
  • Service Content: Provides professional smoking cessation consultation services.
  • Service Recipients: Smokers themselves, family members of smokers, or anyone seeking smoking cessation information.